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Teenage and Juvenile Crime Archives

Teenage and Juvenile Crime: Minor in Possession

In the Teenage and Juvenile Crime arena, a Minor in Possession (MIP) conviction is quite common as underage drinking continues to be a popular pastime.  With the amount of drinking on some college campuses, institutions of higher learning may as well have varsity drinking teams.  Time and again we are reminded that alcohol abuse kills, whether it is the young fraternity pledge who drinks himself to death, or a young drunk driver involved in a fatal accident.

Teenage and Juvenile Crime: Mandatory Life is Too Long

When you think of Teenage and Juvenile Crime it is important to remember that the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution prohibits the use of cruel and unusual punishment. In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional for states to sentence juveniles offenders convicted of murder to mandatory life sentences without the possibility of parole.

Teenage and Juvenile Crime: School Discipline

The Constitution of the United States has several guaranteed rights: life, liberty, property, among others. Learning and understanding the Constitution is not just applicable to history class for some students. The Supreme Court, in Goss v Lopez, 419 U.S. 565 (1975), has stated that due process is not just a right granted to those charged with crimes. It also applies to school disciplinary actions. The 14th Amendment provides Michigan students with the right to attend school, which in turn requires schools to provide notice and an opportunity to be heard if a student has committed a school violation and is facing suspension or expulsion.

Teenage and Juvenile Crime: Minor in Possession

Unsurprisingly, one of the leading Teenage and Juvenile Crime involves alcohol.  Although illegal at the time, teenage drinking for those of us who grew up in the 1980s was hardly the big deal it is in today's criminal justice system. "Back in the day", police officers exercised discretion and either poured it out, or (I assume) took it back to the station for after the shift.  If you were really unlucky in the 80s, the police took you home and you had to face your parents.